In the spirit of Marc Sautet’s “cafés-philos”, join us for a cup of tea while we engage with different philosophers on a variety of topics. The hour long sessions are split between a presentation by the speaker and discussion/Q&A.

This series is done in partnership with Sharing Philosophy, which works to create opportunities for people to learn and to share ideas on what makes a ‘good life’. These opportunities include not only Western philosophies, but also non-Western philosophies, bringing together the world’s various approaches to leading a fulfilling life.

  • Audrey Anton
    April 27, 2019
    4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
    - Sharing Philosophy is very pleased to start off this series with Audrey. Audrey's main area of research is Ancient Philosophy (especially Aristotle's Ethics). Besides teaching standard courses at Western Kentucky University, she teaches courses in prisons whereby half of her students come from WKU and the other half are incarcerated. Audrey is also committed to pre-college education in Philosophy, mentoring a small group of undergraduate students who regularly offer workshops to younger students (for example, in local high schools and juvenile detention centers).
  • Julie Velásquez Runk
    May 25, 2019
    4:00 pm - 5:00 pm
    - Intercultural Ethics: Reflections on being and belonging between Panama’s indigenous Wounaan and mainstream U.S.

    As a scholar of both Anthropology and Environmental Studies, she has worked closely with the Wounaan people of Eastern Panama. Her research focuses on how indigenous people use and manage their landscapes, how that relates to science, conservation, indigenous knowledge, and policy, and how these people cope with variability and change. Through this work Julie has gotten to know the Wounaan intimately, this includes their ways of life, values, and history, and she has agreed to join us for Philosophy Café to speak on these themes.

    This is a great opportunity to learn of indigenous knowledge and a lifestyle that is still vibrant today.

    Café starts at 4:00. The Q&A will be at about 4:30.
  • Indian Philosophy
    August 24, 2019
    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    - After a short summer break, Philosophy Café is up and running again in August. This month's speaker: is Keya Maitra, PhD., Thomas Howerton Distinguished Professor of Humanities, UNC Asheville. Professor Maitra specializes in Indian philosophy, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of language, and she will speak on Consequentialism and the Bhagavad Gītā: Applications in decision making.

    This is a wonderful opportunity to approach a seminal Indian text from a normative ethics framework. Come ready to discuss!

    Café starts at 3:00. The Q&A will be at about 3:30.
  • Japanese Buddhism
    September 28, 2019
    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    - Pamela Winfield, PhD., Associate Professor of Religious Studies, Elon University. Professor Winfield is a specialist in Japanese Culture and Religions, particularly Japanese Buddhism.

    Café starts at 3:00. The Q&A will be at about 3:30.
  • Confucian and Daoist Thought
    October 26, 2019
    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    - David Wong, PhD., Susan Fox Beischer & George D. Beischer Trinity College Arts and Sciences Professor of Philosophy, Duke University. David's singular philosophy reflects his deep knowledge of Confucian and Daoist thought. He will be discussing with us his views on the importance of studying various moralities and how, from a moral perspective, the roles of reflection, feeling, and other people play in helping us change.

    Café starts at 3:00. The Q&A will be at about 3:30.
  • Aristotle on Education
    November 16, 2019
    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    - A talk by Prof. David Reeve, UNC-Chapel Hill

    Café starts at 3:00. The Q&A will be at about 3:30.
  • Aristotle's Four Elements
    January 25, 2020
    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    - Dead Science or Ancient Innovation? A talk about Aristotle's views on the natural world - what the world is made of, how it began, and what makes us human.

    Café starts at 3:00. The Q&A will be at about 3:30. Meeting Room A

    Mary Krizan is associate professor of philosophy at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse. Her work focuses on Ancient Greek Philosophy, particularly Aristotle's metaphysics and natural philosophy.

    Dr. Krizan’s research has appeared in Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy, Journal of the History of Philosophy, Ancient Philosophy, and History of Philosophy Quarterly. During the 2019–20 academic year, Dr. Krizan will complete a monograph, titled Aristotle’s Material Elements, which will provide a detailed interpretation of Aristotle’s simple bodies and resolve questions related to the most basic matter in Aristotle’s metaphysics and the interactions of material elements with one another and the universe as a whole.
  • In It's Own Light
    February 15, 2020
    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    - In it's own light: A survey of Indian Philosophy Joe Milillo is an independent researcher of South Asian thought and religion, and founder of Sharing Philosophy.

    Joe's past research has focused on ancient Indian philosophy of mind, theories of hermeneutics, and non-dual metaphysics. His talk will cover the four main aspects of philosophy and how various thinkers in India have grappled with them, thereby not only giving a general understanding of Indian philosophy, but also demonstrating that Indian philosophy deserves the attention of Western academic philosophy departments.
  • Islamic Mysticism
    March 28, 2020
    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    - Islamic Mysticism & Philosophy

    Carl W. Ernst, Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of Islamic studies at the Department of Religious Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

    Professor Ernst works on the poetry of the early Sufi and martyr, al-Hallaj (executed in Baghdad in 922) and the interaction between Sufism and Yoga, among many other topics. He will share a brief history of Sufism, its beliefs and practices, and its growth in South Asia.
  • Classical American Philosophy
    April 11, 2020
    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    - John Dewey and the Originality of Classical American Philosophy

    This month's speaker: Yoram Lubling, Professor of Philosophy at Elon University.

    The discussion will unpack several commitments, principles, and claims shared by all philosophers who work within the classical tradition of American philosophy (from Emerson to John Dewey). We will examine the tradition's rejection of metaphysical dualism, traditional empiricism, and the superiority of theory over praxis, as well as its commitments to genuine pluralism, fallibilism, and the centrality of the community.

    Café starts at 3:00. The Q&A will be at about 3:30.

    Meeting Room B
  • Harmony in Native American Thinking
    May 16, 2020
    3:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    - John Dewey and the Originality of Classical American Philosophy

    This month's speaker: Joey Miller, Adjunct Instructor in Philosophy at Elon University

    Harmony plays a central role in Native American ethics. In this talk, the emphasis on harmony will be explained, as well as its applications in ethics, science, and general knowledge.

    Café starts at 3:00. The Q&A will be at about 3:30.

    Meeting Room B

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