Banned Books

You can support the project by purchasing collector’s sets from our Friend’s website. Current and past sets are available!

Banned Books Week 2016

Banned Books Week is an annual, national celebration of your freedom to read. Chapel Hill Public Library, in partnership with the Division of Cultural Arts, celebrates by asking local artists to create original works of art inspired by a banned book or author whose work has been challenged.

Each piece represents the ongoing struggle for intellectual freedom and the dangers of censorship. Seven works are printed as trading cards that we give to the public during Banned Books Week.

Collect your free set in person from September 25 – October 1. You can support the project by purchasing collector’s sets from our Friend’s website. Current and past sets are available!

  • Banned Books Project Chapel Hill
  • Banned Books Project Chapel Hill
  • Banned Books Project Chapel Hill
  • Banned Books Project Chapel Hill
  • Banned Books Project Chapel Hill
  • Banned Books Project Chapel Hill
  • Banned Books Project Chapel Hill
  • Banned Books Project Chapel Hill
  • Banned Books Project Chapel Hill
  • Banned Books Project Chapel Hill
  • Banned Books Project Chapel Hill Monday Card
  • Banned Books Project Chapel Hill Monday Card
  • Banned Books Project Chapel Hill
  • Banned Books Project Chapel Hill
The 7 winning pieces

Banned Books Week 2016

Banned Books Week is an annual, national celebration of your freedom to read. Chapel Hill Public Library, in partnership with the Division of Cultural Arts, celebrates by asking local artists to create original works of art inspired by a banned book or author whose work has been challenged.

Each piece represents the ongoing struggle for intellectual freedom and the dangers of censorship. Seven works are printed as trading cards that we give to the public during Banned Books Week.

“If all printers were determined not to print anything till they were sure it would offend nobody, there would be very little printed.”Benjamin Franklin

by Libby Fosso

Book: Fun Home by Alison Bechdel

Reason for Banning: Both public libraries and college campuses have seen challenges to this award-winning graphic novel. In 2015, Freshmen at Duke University refused to read it, citing moral or religious objections to its LGBT themes and “pornographic” art.

Artist: Libby Fosso

Artists’s Statement: The image is not an explicit statement on transgender issues, but more a general commentary on the sexual angst that Bechdel explores and the discomfort caused by North Carolina’s House Bill 2. When we box people in with labels and signs we question our very identity.

by Heather Jolley Smith

Book: The Awakening by Kate Chopin

Reason for Banning: Upon its publication, Chopin’s novel exploring female sexuality and self-fulfillment was almost universally condemned as “morbid, vulgar, disagreeable, and scandalous.” Now hailed as a feminist classic, it still faces challenges to its content and cover art.

Artist: Heather Jolley Smith

Artists’s Statement: In 2016, it’s hard to fathom how in 1899 any woman’s self-knowledge was considered scandalous. I depicted Edna as constrained by her corset and parasol, gazing longingly at the ocean where she finds bother her first taste of freedom and subsequent demise.

by Emma Richardson

Book: Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

Reason for Banning: This 1978 Newbery Award winner is among the most challenged books in the United States. Challengers claim that it contains offensive language, occult subject matter, and deals with the “adult” theme of death.

Artist: Emma Richardson

Artists’s Statement: Jesse Aarons and Leslie Burke are the rulers of Terabithia. I showed them running through their land with Leslie running in front of Jesse because she is the fastest running in the 5th grade, which is in part how they become friends.

“Every burned book enlightens the world.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson

by Tanasha Lertjanyarak

Book: Animal Farm by  George Orwell

Reason for Banning: Orwell’s novella has the distinction of being on most high school curricula but is also frequently challenged for its political themes. The 1954 animated adaptation of the novel was funded by the CIA and features an ending very different from the book.

Artist: Robert Votta

Artists’s Statement: Animal Farm is a political novel. The big eyes represent the dictator’s all-encompassing vision. The animals wear masks to show ignorance. Apples and milk signify the nation’s wealth which is unavailable to the mindless animals.

by Molly Cassidy

Book: A Light in the Attic by Shel Silverstein

Reason for Banning: This popular collection was challenged by parents concerned that the poem How Not to Have to Dry the Dishes encouraged children to “break dishes so they don’t have to dry them.” Other challenges claim the book “glorified Satan, suicide, and cannibalism.”

Artist: Molly Cassidy

Artists’s Statement: I wanted to depict what I feel was Silverstein’s approach to life: hopeful, irreverent, joyous. While indulging in my own artistic style for the representation of his thoughts, the rendition of the author is a nod to Silverstein’s own illustrative style.

by Amy Trojanowski

Book: Sophie’s Choice by William Styron

Reason for Banning: TThe National Book Award winner was censored in the Soviet Union. In Poland, its “unflinching portrait of Polish anti-Semitism” led to challenges. It was pulled and subsequently restored to shelves at United States high schools after complaints about sexual content.

Artist: Amy Trojanowski

Artists’s Statement: The basis for this design is a Polish papercutting technique known as wycinanki. Sophie, on top, faces a stark choice at Auschwitx (indicated by the railroad tracks) between her daughter, left, and her son, right. Arrows and hearts represent the directions in which she was torn, then and now.

If every individual with an agenda had his/her way, the shelves in the school library would be close to empty.Judy Blume

by Robert Votta

Book: Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck

Reason for Banning: Condemned as “filth” and “communist propaganda,” this novel has at times been banned and even burned in several countries including the US, Canada, Ireland, Turkey, and the former USSR. It is still challenged in the United States for “vulgar language.”

Artist: Robert Votta

Artists’s Statement: This novel won the 1939 Pulitzer Prize for fiction, yet school boards and libraries banned the book in many localities for being “un-American” or “communistic.” In the great winepress, the workers are the grapes being crushed by the large, powerful hands of the corporate farm owners.

by Lizzie Kuhlman

Book: Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling

Reason for Banning: J.K. Rowling’s popular series has often been challenged for its violene and magical content that “glorifies Satan.” Some parents have also cited concerns that Harry often “lies, breaks rules, and disobeys authority figures, including professors at Hogwarts.”

Artist: Lizzy Kuhlman

Artists’s Statement: This image shows how Harry and his nemesis Voldemort have shocking similarities and yet are completely different. The two faces are separated with a wand, which also represents the magic that is why the series is so often banned.

by Michael Crowell

The Jury Prize is a first for the Banned Books Trading Cards Project. The jury respects both the artistry and the message, yet felt the work fell outside the scope of the Call For Artists.

Chapel Hill-based artist Michael Crowell wrote this statement:

“People have been banned from libraries as well as books. Geraldine Edwards was one of nine African American Tougaloo College students arrested at the white public library in Jackson, Mississippi on March 27, 1961, for attempting to read books that could not be found at the “colored” library. Ms. Edwards, now Geraldine Edwards-Hollis, has written a book about her experience, Back to Mississippi (Xlibris Corporation, 2011).

Click here for an interview with Geraldine Edwards-Hollis talking about the sit-in.


All entries from 2016


2015 Winners

  • 2015 Banned Books Trading Cards at Chapel Hill Public Library
  • 2015 Banned Books Trading Cards at Chapel Hill Public Library
  • 2015 Banned Books Trading Cards at Chapel Hill Public Library
  • 2015 Banned Books Trading Cards at Chapel Hill Public Library
  • 2015 Banned Books Trading Cards Chapel Hill Public Library
  • 2015 Banned Books Trading Cards Chapel Hill Public Library
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  • 2015 Banned Books Trading Cards Chapel Hill Public Library
  • 2015 Banned Books Trading Cards Chapel Hill Public Library
  • 2015 Banned Books Trading Cards Chapel Hill Public Library
  • 2015 Banned Books Trading Cards Chapel Hill Public Library
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2014 Winners

  • Chapel Hill Public Library Banned Books Trading Cards
  • The Scarlet Letter Banned Book Trading Cards Project
  • I know why the caged bird sings banned book
  • Chapel Hill Public Library Banned Books Project -Leaves of Grass Walt Whitman
  • where the wild things are banned book trading card Chapel Hill Public Library
  • Banned Books local art Perks of Being a Wallflower
  • Chapel Hill Public Library Banned Books Trading Cards 2014

2013 Winners

  • 1984 Chapel Hill Public Library Banned Books Projecct
  • BBW Banned Books Week Art project
  • Clay Carmichael Banned Books Kids
  • BBW Banned Books Week Art project
  • BBW Banned Books Week Art project
  • BBW Banned Books Week Art project
  • BBW Banned Books Week Art project

Want to celebrate the freedom to read, support local art, and make sure the project continues? You can buy past years sets from our Friends.

Thank you to all artists. Please join us on Friday, September 23rd for a public reception.

Call for Local Artists

The Chapel Hill Public Library, in partnership with the Parks & Recreation Division of Cultural Arts, is celebrating intellectual freedom and Banned Books Week in an interesting, fun, and unique way. We are asking local artists from Orange, Durham, Wake, Chatham and Alamance counties to create small scale (5” wide x 7” tall) works of art inspired by a banned/challenged book or author.

Based on their artistic excellence, seven of this year’s new works will be selected by a jury to receive $100 awards and be printed as trading cards, with the artwork on the front and the artist’s statement and information about the highlighted book or author on the back. A special $100 award for best youth entry will also be given to an artist under 18 years of age. All entries will be displayed during Banned Books Week and beyond at the Library and selected artist-designed cards will be printed and distributed to the public, with one given away each day of the week long celebration at the Library.

Find Inspiration

For a partial list of banned books see the following resources:

Project Details

Submissions created in any medium, including digital, are welcome, though art must be in hard copy format on paper for judging.

Original artwork will be returned to the artist at the conclusion of the project unless the piece wins. Winning entries will be auctioned to support the Friends of Chapel Hill Public Library, a 501-C3 non-profit. Artists may submit up to three different works of art.

All submissions must measure 5 inches wide by 7 tall inches (no horizontal artwork accepted) and include a ¼ inch bleed on all sides (meaning important words and images should be ¼ inch inside of the edges of the artwork; see diagrams and template below).

Final printed cards will measure 2.5 wide by 3.5 inches tall; the standard size of a trading card. Each submission must be accompanied by a complete submission form that includes name, age and contact information for the artist; the title of the book and name of the author that inspired the artwork; and a brief 50-word-or-less statement of how the piece reflects the book and/or author.

Nonconforming entries will not be eligible for exhibition or award. By submitting artwork to this exhibition, artists are granting the Chapel Hill Public Library the right to reproduce artwork images for publicity and also to sell the artwork images on trading cards for the benefit of the Library.

To submit your work in the contest, bring the final physical hard copy and the accompanying paperwork to any service desk at the library, or mail entries to Banned Books attn. Susan Maguire, 100 Library Dr, Chapel Hill, NC 27514. You will need to fill out this form for each piece you submit.

A Selection Committee comprising local arts and literary professionals, Library staff and Cultural Arts Commission members will review all complete submissions and select seven finalists. Once selected, those artists’ works will be scanned and printed as trading cards. The cards will be handed out daily at the Library during Banned Book Week. Like other trading cards, these are sure to be collected and shared.
The project will be publicized in the local media, through Town communication channels, and through the library itself – via website, social media, mailing lists, and in-house promotion.
August 29, 2016 – deadline for submissions

September 01, 2016 – review and selection of seven finalists, notification sent

September 23, 2016 – Exhibit Opening

September 25, 2016 – First trading card unveiled and made available to the public.

One trading card will be available each day during Banned Books Week (September 25 – October 1) at the Library

The Cultural Arts Division and Chapel Hill Public Library reserve the right to refuse any or all submissions, to refuse any finalist, to waive informalities in proposals or procedures, or to withhold the award of a commission should it be determined that submissions are not adequate, or for any other reason prior to a written contractual arrangement being reached.

Questions For delivery in person, by mail or for additional information please contact:

Susan Maguire

Chapel Hill Public Library 100 Library Drive Chapel Hill, NC 27514

smaguire@townofchapelhill.org

(919) 968-2777


Formatting your entry

In order for your artwork to print correctly as a trading card, the image must leave a quarter-inch (.25″) margin on on each side.

“Bad” bleed

“Good” bleed